White Balance  

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Ulana
(@uswitucha)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 352
April 28, 2019 6:25 pm  

White Balance - What is your approach?  

I am processing a panoramic image of a view from a mountain top. The photo was shot on a clear blue sky day in the afternoon and has a blue cast in the vegetation (greens are reading blue) and in the distant topography.

I am wondering how you address modifying White Balance in your workflow. What tools do you use?

The image was shot on autoWB. Below is a screen shot of the merged pano before any edits.

unnamed

 


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Raaj
 Raaj
(@rshinde)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 647
April 28, 2019 8:22 pm  

Hi Ulana,

I am not sure a WB change will solve your problem in this instance as WB changes change the color temperature of the entire image, which may or may not always work.

In Photoshop try the following:

Image>Adjuttments>Match Color and then on the dialog box that opens:

Match Color and  RNS6281 openWith dng   16 7   RGB 8

Click the "Neutralize" box and see what that does.  Usually if there is a uniform color cast that is across the frame, this removes that bias and does wonders.

Please let me know if that works for you.

Cheers!


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John Motzi
(@jmotzi)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 246
April 28, 2019 8:25 pm  

Hi Ulana,

I don't think it matters these days exactly what settings you use to shoot since one is able to change it in Raw Processing.  Out of habit I shoot everything at 5000K but the final results (after processing) would not be different if I shot in Auto WB.

There are four main methods I have used to correct in Raw:

1. (Lightroom or ACR in Photoshop): find something that is supposed to be neutral color (black, white or gray) and select using the WB eyedropper tool to make the adjustment.  If I do this with snow I often get a slightly warm WB which I quite like.

2. (Lightroom or ACR in Photoshop): hunt around and do various selections with the WB eyedropper tool to get an effect you like.  Hey this is art 🙂

3. (ACR in Photoshop only): use the WB eyedropper tool to drag and select a large area (perhaps the entire image) to get an average correction for the selection.  This works only in ACR from within Photoshop.

4.  Manually move the color temperature and tint controls in Raw to get the desired effect.

For me, it's all aesthetics unless I am doing studio photography of floral designs and then I need to go for accurate color (using a gray card) similar to product photography.  In the image you show above, the sky is a nice blue and I would tend to only selectively adjust color to get the greens I want using the hue & saturation tool.  I love blue skies that tend to very slight magenta vs slight cyan (especially in real life), but it really depends on the scene.  But that's just my approach.

JM


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John Motzi
(@jmotzi)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 246
April 28, 2019 8:28 pm  

Hey @rshinde, we were typing at the same time!  I'll have to try your approach - something I've never tried!


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Ulana
(@uswitucha)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 352
April 28, 2019 9:06 pm  

Thank you both.  Will fiddle around with these options.  I also found a you tube on how to use curves to colour correct specific areas (with masking) that might also be helpful.  

I agree with John on the blue skies and this one is too cyan for my taste.


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Raaj
 Raaj
(@rshinde)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 647
April 28, 2019 9:46 pm  

Hi @uswitcuha, I think with your image, you may find the Color Match, Neutralize strategy either works well on its own or gives you a great starting point for more tweaks using other techniques.

@jmotzi, I've found this to be a bit of a gem - it removes color casts effortlessly! 🙂

Cheers!


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Ulana
(@uswitucha)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 352
April 30, 2019 12:31 am  

Interesting how each one of those methods has different results.   A great learning experience.


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John Motzi
(@jmotzi)
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 246
April 30, 2019 2:33 pm  
Posted by: Ulana

Interesting how each one of those methods has different results.   A great learning experience.

Just like when you ask each of us, you get different answers 🙂

 


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