New technique for f...
 

New technique for flowers...  

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Randy Tesch
(@rstesch)
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 14
September 19, 2019 10:35 pm  

Yesterday, a Lansing photography Meetup group scheduled an outing at Michigan State University's Horticultural Garden.  Having never been there before, I wanted to join them.  I have never used my studio monolights with anything except portraits before - so I brought one along to try using one on flowers.  I was pretty happy with my initial results.

2019.09.18  MSU Horticulture  131

2019.09.18  MSU Horticulture  153

2019.09.18  MSU Horticulture  134


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Raaj
 Raaj
(@rshinde)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 706
September 20, 2019 12:03 pm  

Hi Randy, @rstesch

Sounds like you had fun at this outing.  I've never used strobes on flowers but I do use continuous lighting when I shoot flowers and I've found controlling light via an artificial source makes a huge difference.

Look forward to seeing more.

Cheers!

 


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Randy Tesch
(@rstesch)
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 14
September 20, 2019 3:49 pm  

@rshinde

Thanks, Raaj!

I did notice how much the shadows would change as I slightly changed the height of my strobe (obviously).  I later realized that I should have brought a very fine spray bottle of water to add very fine water droplets to the pedals.  Oh well, live and hopefully learn.

The strobe allowed my to shoot at my camera's native ISO 64, apertures of f/8 and f/11, and still freeze the movement caused by the air.  

This post was modified 4 weeks ago by Randy Tesch

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John Motzi
(@jmotzi)
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 282
September 21, 2019 10:40 pm  

Nice work Randy!  I did a lot of work in the past with single flower portraits  and strobes.  The nice thing is that when you are able to use large quantities of light up close, your ambient background goes black.  Light & distance are wonderful creative tools.

JM


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Randy Tesch
(@rstesch)
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 14
October 3, 2019 10:00 pm  

@jmotzi

Thanks, John!  It is fun experimenting with new techniques.


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